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Glassware


Champagne Glass

Handling Glassware

Storing Glassware

Washing Glassware

Glassware Service

Types Of Glassware

 

When preparing a drink, in addition to the recipe, it is also important to know how to properly select, handle, clean, dry and store glassware.

 

Handling Glassware

Always handle glassware by the outside bottom half, avoiding areas of the glass that come in contact with your guest’s mouth. It is unsanitary to ever touch the rim or inside of a clean glass while handling it. Never use a glass to scoop ice from the bin. The glass could chip or break in the ice, causing someone to be served a drink with a glass shard hidden in the ice.

Finally, inspect glasses before adding ice, or pouring products. Watch for spots, lipstick smudges, grease or oily deposits, chips, cracks, off-odors, or anything that is unappealing in any way. In the event of glass breakage anywhere near or in the ice bin, all of the ice must be immediately removed and replaced. This is an absolute rule of safety behind the bar. It is impossible to see and remove pieces of broken glass from ice cubes.

 

Storing Glassware

Clean glasses must be stored properly in order to stay clean until needed again. Glassware should be inverted and stored on level shelves covered with open matting that allows air to circulate under the glass. Glasses should never be stored in a refrigerator or glass chiller that is not clean and odor-free. Odors in the glass will affect the flavor of many beverages, particularly wine and beer. Glasses should be stored in areas away from smoke, grease, or dust. This is often not the case, however, with overhead racks used for hanging wine and cocktail glasses. If a bar has more glassware than it needs at any one time, the back rows of glasses may not get used frequently. Rotate the glassware stock occasionally to prevent these glasses from becoming dusty.

 

Washing Glassware

Knowing how to properly wash, sanitize and dry your bar’s glassware is an important part of creating excellent cocktails. When a drink is served in a dirty glass, your reputation suffers and the drink is lost down the drain.

The best drink in the world will be rejected if the glass is dirty.

  1. Three-Compartment Sinks
       The commercial method of washing glassware is to use a three-compartment sink positioned near the bartender’s workstation. This type of standard bar sink is often required by the Health Department even when there is a glass-washing machine.
       The three-compartment sink contains from left to right, wash water, clear rinse water and a sanitizing solution. The first compartment of the sink will usually be equipped with submerged motorized brushes designed to scrub all surfaces of a glass that is plunged and raised across the spinning bristles. The motorized brush is considered more effective in cleaning glassware than stationary mounted brushes, or hand held brushes, cloths, or sponges. The middle sink will contain hot, clear rinse water. A trickle of hot water running into this sink will not only help maintain the proper temperature, but also keep the water clear by causing the soap rinsed from the washed glassware to drain off the surface of the water and down the standpipe. The third sink is for rinsing and sanitizing in either warm or cool water.
       Besides sterilizing the glassware, which is mandatory under every state’s health codes, this second rinse can also contain a solution to prevent spotting while the glassware dries. The second and third sinks will have standpipes inserted in the drains to keep the sink full yet prevent overflow. The second compartment’s standpipe may sometimes have a funnel in it to catch and drain the glass’ contents before washing. Some commercial bars will have a separate sink for this purpose, called a “dump sink.”
       Before filling the sinks for the first time each day, then during each draining and refilling, the stainless steel sinks must be scrubbed clean. Adding clean water and new solutions to a dirty sink will keep the various solutions from working properly. The soap used should be a low suds, non-fat and non-petroleum-based detergent made especially for glassware. If possible, rinse beer glasses before washing. This will remove any foam, or remaining beer that could cause the cleaning solution to break down and lose its effectiveness.
       When rinsing in either the second or third sink, submerge the glass bottom first, into the water. Angling the glass like this will eliminate the possibility of air pockets forming inside the glass and prevent proper rinsing. The solutions in the sinks should be changed whenever they become weak, or the temperature becomes too cool. Having to rewash glassware and/or listen to guest complaints is not worth the few minutes’ effort saved by ignoring dirty sinks. Glassware should always be allowed to air dry rather than be wiped dry. It should be placed open-end down on a corrugated surface to drain, such as the stainless steel drain boards along the three-compartment sink. This will allow air to freely circulate inside the glasses as they drip dry. Never place wet glasses upside down on a smooth countertop or towel.
  2. Automatic Glass-Washing Machines
       High volume bars are sometimes equipped with an automatic glass-washing machine at the bar. These machines are capable of doing several racks of glasses in a very short time, although some of that time savings is lost waiting for the glasses to cool down enough to be used again. Most machines on the market today are easy to use and little training is required. When operated correctly, they will clean the glassware more thoroughly and consistently than when done by hand.

 

Glassware Service

Glassware is your primary creative vehicle. Its transparency makes it an ideal vehicle for presenting drinks of all types. In addition, glass is an excellent insulator that helps keep cold drinks cold and warm drinks warm. The best way to make a cocktail look as good as it tastes is to present it in a fabulous looking glass. It is one of the most important elements in defining the drink’s style.

A glassware type recommendation is made with each recipe. The decision as to what size glass to use should be based on the size of the drink. For example, if you intend to make a champagne-based cocktail you will need a champagne or wine glass with the capacity to accommodate that size portion. If you already have a glass that you want to serve the cocktail in, but it’s not the right size, you can always adjust the recipe ingredients proportionately to fit your glass.

To determine the type of glass for your cocktail, consider the capacity of the glass when filled with ice. For example, a 9-ounce glass will hold approximately 3 to 4 ounces of liquid when completely filled with cubed ice.

Included is a list of beverage, cocktail, wine and beer service glassware to consider for the glassware types recommended in each recipe. The references are intended as excellent representations of the quality, style, size and shape of glasses that are available today.

 

Types Of Glassware

Listed below are general glassware types to provide a basic understanding of glassware service. These are general guidelines. Use your creativity and think of how to best present each specialty to make your final glassware decision. Chill glasses whenever possible when preparing cocktails. It will help to keep the drink chilled and enhance the presentation of your cocktail.

 

  Beer Glassessee Mug and Pilsner
Brandy Snifter Brandy Snifter
Capacity: 6 - 24 oz.
Function: Brandy neat, also used as a
house specialty glass to serve everything
from a brandy-based cocktail to a frozen
Margarita
Bucket Glass Bucket Glass
aka Double Rocks Glass
Capacity: 11 – 14 oz.
Function: Tall mixed drinks, specialty drinks
Champagne Flute Champagne Flute
Capacity: 4 - 9 oz.
Function: Champagne or sparkling wine, also
used to serve Champagne-based cocktails
Champagne Saucer Champagne Saucer
Capacity: 3 - 7 oz.
Function: Champagne or sparkling wine,
also used to serve champagne-based
cocktails and frappes
Cocktail Glass Cocktail Glass
Capacity: 3 - 7 oz.
Function: Cocktails served straight-up
Note: Chill before use
Coffee Mug Coffee Mug
Capacity: 9 - 14 oz.
Function: Hot drinks
Note: Warm glass before use with hot water;
also see Hot Drink Glasses
Collins Glass Collins Glass
aka Chimney Glass
Capacity: 10 - 14 oz.
Function: Tall mixed drinks
Cordial Glass Cordial Glass
aka Pousse Café Glass, Pony Glass
Capacity: 1 - 3 oz.
Function: Liqueurs or cordials neat, also
layered cordial drinks
Note: The term “Pony” is used for a 1 oz.
cordial glass
Double Rocks Glass Double Rocks Glass
aka Bucket or Double Old Fashion
Capacity: 12 - 16 oz.
Function: Double portion of a product
on-the-rocks or tall mixed drink
Highball Glass Highball Glass
Capacity: 7 - 12 oz.
Function: Mixed drinks
Hot Drink Glass Hot Drink Glass
Capacity: 8 - 12 oz.
Functions: Hot coffee, tea, Cappuccino and
hot specialty drinks
Coupette     Fiesta Grande  

Hurricane             Poco Grande
House Specialty Glass
Ex: Coupette, Poco Grande, Fiesta Grande,
Hurricane

Capacity: 9 - 24 oz.
Functions: Blended cocktails and house
specialty drinks, most frequently used for
frozen Daiquiris, Margaritas, tropical drinks
and blended ice cream drinks
Mixing Glass Mixing Glass/Pint Glass
Capacity: 16 oz.
Function: Hand mixing drinks, as the glass
half of a traditional mixing set; also used for
soft drinks, beer and specialty drinks
Mug Mug
aka Beer Mug
Capacity: 10 - 20 oz.
Function: Draft, bottled beer service, or
beer drinks
Old Fashion Glass Old Fashion Glass
Capacity: 7 - 12 oz.
Function: Old fashions and rocks drinks
Note: The heavy base makes it different
from a standard rocks glass
  Pony Glasssee Cordial Glass
Pilsner, Footed Pilsner, Footed
Capacity: 8 - 16 oz.
Function: Draft, bottled beer service, or
beer drinks
Pilsner, Hourglass Pilsner, Hourglass
Capacity: 8 - 16 oz.
Function: Draft, bottled beer service, or
beer drinks
  Pousse Café Glasssee Cordial Glass
Presentation Shot Glass Presentation Shot Glass
Capacity: 3/4 - 3 oz.
Function: Liquor neat, also used to serve
layered cordial drinks, “Slammers” and
“Shooters”
Note: Traditionally has a faceted, heavy base
Rocks Glass Rocks Glass
Capacity: 6 - 10 oz.
Function: Liquor or liqueur on the rocks
Sherry Glass Sherry Glass
Capacity: 2 - 4 3/4 oz.
Function: Sherry, port, or aperitifs neat,
also used to serve liqueurs neat or layered
cordial drinks
Shot Glass Shot Glass
Capacity: 3/4 - 2 oz.
Function: Liquor neat, also used as
measuring device
  Sniftersee Brandy Snifter
Sour Glass Sour Glass
Capacity: 4 - 6 oz.
Function: Sours and stone sours served
straight-up
Wine Glass, Red Wine Glass, Red
Capacity: 9 - 14 oz.
Function: Red wines, also used to serve a
variety of wine-based drinks
Wine Glass, White Wine Glass, White
Capacity: 9 - 14 oz.
Function: White or blush wines, also used to
serve a variety of wine-based drinks

 

Impress your friends!

Practice holding two or more glasses at a time, in one hand. This will also make a big difference in how quickly you can make a drink, since the less time it takes to select and ice down glassware, the less time it takes to prepare each round.